Large jewellers forced to disclose staff salaries

LONDON - NOVEMBER 23:  People walk past the De Beers store in Bond Street on November 23, 2006 in London, England. The price of Gold in London steadied in quiet trade ahead of a U.S Thanksgiving holiday but platinum gained in value after tumbling this week from record highs.  (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

The UK government will introduce a new legislation this week that will require private sector employers to publish annual data on their gender pay gap, in a game-changing move that could result in fair pay for women in retail.

Under the Equality Act (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2016, due to come into force on October 1, employers will need to take a snapshot of their gender pay data in April 2017, and publish the information on their UK website no later than April 2018.

The news comes amid reports that men in the retail and wholesale sectors are paid an average of £4,523 more a year than women.

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The new legislation will initially apply to organisations that employ 250 people or more, although it is widely expected that this minimum qualifying criteria will reduce.

The government has stated that it will run checks to assess for non-compliance, publish league tables by sector of employers’ reported gender pay gaps and that it may name and shame employers who have not complied with the requirements.

The gender pay gap is the difference between the average pay of all male employers and the average pay of all female employers.


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